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Information Literacy for Faculty at UCBA

Overview of the Library's information literacy and instruction program.

Student Learning Outcomes

The ACRL Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education provides a foundation for the student learning outcomes that support the UCBA Library's information literacy and instruction program.  These outcomes are designed to address the research needs of two-year college students at the emerging (i.e. introduce concept) or developing (i.e. apply concept) levels while helping them grow as learners.  

Research as Inquiry and Searching as Strategic Exploration

Focuses on developing topics and questions and searching for information using a variety of methods. 

  • Students will use keywords and applicable limiters when searching for information.
    • Apply a new search based on the relevancy of initial search results to the topic.
    • Assess the information source's content to determine if it meets the information need.
    • Give credit to ideas and work of others through proper attribution and citation.

Information Creation as a Process

Involves the range of formats for information. 

  • Students will recognize the value of different types of information sources within the context of the research topic.
    • Assess the information source's content to determine if it meets the information need.

Information has Value

Centers on the social, economic, and personal value of information, responsibility of using information, and citation.

To more fully integrate the importance of this frame, the UCBA Library folded this into the core concepts of inquiry, searching, evaluation, and scholarship. See "Give credit to ideas and work of others through proper attribution and citation." 

Authority is Constructed and Contextual

Concentrates on the creator(s) of information and situating the information in context.

  • Students will define authority based on the influencing factors of context and community of expertise.
  • Students will evaluate a source's credibility by considering authority, type of source, creation process, purpose, and/or point of view.
    • Assess the information source's content to determine if it meets the information need.
    • Give credit to ideas and work of others through proper attribution and citation.

Scholarship as Conversation

Focuses on scholarly discourse and perspectives.

  • Students will recognize a given scholarly work may not represent the only, or even the majority perspective on the research topic.
    • Give credit to ideas and work of others through proper attribution and citation.
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