Skip to main content
It looks like you're using Internet Explorer 11 or older. This website works best with modern browsers such as the latest versions of Chrome, Firefox, Safari, and Edge. If you continue with this browser, you may see unexpected results.
UC Logo
Libraries | Ask the Libraries

Legal Practice Tools

Practice Tools are a subset of secondary sources. They can assist you in litigation and transactional matters as well as save you from having to reinvent the wheel. This guide will introduce you to some useful practice tools.

Overview

A legal treatise is a book or set of books on a legal topic that are written by experts. Sometimes students get confused between "treatise" and "treaty."   A treatise is a scholarly book or set of books about a legal topic. It is a secondary source. A treaty is a primary source legal agreement between countries. A good treatise is thorough, explaining and even critiquing, the law. A treatise can be an extremely useful secondary source for research because it gathers such detailed information on a particular legal topic or issue into one publication. 

If you practice in a certain area of law, you will become familiar with the well-known and highly respected treatises in that area. If you are unfamiliar with an area of law, consult a research guide on that area of law written by a law librarian.

Finding Tools Within Treatises

Indexes

Table of Contents

Updating

Many treatises are updated by pocket parts or supplements.  Some treatises, known as "loose-leafs" are updated by new pages being inserted into a binder.

Books available through Lexis, Westlaw & Bloomberg BNA

There are many treatises available through Lexis, Westlaw, and Bloomberg Law.

Search the UC Library Catalog

Always check UCLID first to see if a book is available in our library or another UC library. Note that even if checking out a book for a UC journal, YOU and not the journal are responsible for that book.  Be sure and renew and return your books as needed.

When you find a title through UCLID, the online catalog, that is owned by another library:

  • Click on the Request button. 
  • Enter your username and password
  • Select Law Library as your pick-up library
  • Click on the Submit button.

The book will be delivered to the Law Library and you will receive an email in your UC email account when it comes. Be aware that it may take 3 or more days to arrive. Note that if your pick-up location and request location are the same, the request is not processed. In other words, if a book is available in the law library, do not request it. Instead retrieve the book yourself and check it out.

OhioLINK Catalog Search

 If a book you want is not available at UC, you may be able to find and borrow it through the OhioLINK.  Be sure and check UCLID first.  OhioLINK is also accessible through UCLID (click the search OhioLINK button)

 

by

for:

Note that even if checking out a book for a UC journal, YOU and not the journal are responsible for that book.  Be sure and renew and return your books as needed.  Renew books or check due dates.

The book will be delivered to the Law Library and you will be notified when it comes.  Please remember that all library communications are sent to your UC email account so be sure and check it regularly or forward it to an email account that you do check regularly.  Be aware that it may take 5 or more days to arrive.

WorldCat Catalog

If a book you want is not available in UCLID or OhioLINK, you will need to submit an Interlibrary Loan Request.

  • Find the book in WorldCat (use the box below for a simple search, use the WorldCat Advanced Search for more search options).
    • To access advanced WorldCat from Off-Campus, you will need to use VPN
  • Fill out an ILL form with the information you found in WorldCat. Note that the Law Library does not use ILLiad at this time.

 

Search for an item in libraries near you:
WorldCat.org >>

The book will be delivered to the Law Library and you will receive an email in your UC email account when it comes.  Be aware that it may take 10 or more days to arrive.  Circulation loan periods will vary.  Renewal options will also vary.

 

 

Google Books

Some books may be available via Google Books.  Primarily, these are books within the public domain.  Limited previews may be offered for other books.  If you need a copy of a book found through Google Books, please check WorldCat and fill out an Interlibrary Loan Request.

Video Tutorials on Treatises

CALI Lesson on Subject Specific Treatises

CALI LogoAvailable to Law Students only (see a reference librarian if you do not have a CALI activation code).

Citation Format for Treatises

Bluebook

Rule 15 of the Bluebook (20th ed.) covers citing treatises. There are many variables in citing a treatise so definitely consult the rule for its many permutations. 

Elements

Generally, a citation to a treatise should contain the following elements:

  • Volume (if applicable)
  • Author (see R. 15(b) for more than 2 authors and R. 15(c) for institutional authors)
  • Title (italicized or underlined)
  • Section and/or Page
  • Editor, translators (if applicable)
  • Edition
  • Copyright Date

Example

2 Joseph M. Perillo & Helen Hadjiyannakis Bender, Corbin on Contracts § 1.1 (1993).

ALWD

Rule 20.3 of the ALWD Citation Manual (5th ed.) covers the citation of books.

Elements
  • Volume number (if applicable)
  • Author (see R. 20.1(b)(2) for multiple authors and R. 20.1(b)(3) for institutional authors
  • Title (italicized or underlined)
  • Section and/or Page
  • Editor, translators (if applicable)
  • Edition
  • Date

Example

2 Joseph M. Perillo & Helen Hadjiyannakis Bender, Corbin on Contracts § 1.1 (1993).

University of Cincinnati Libraries

PO Box 210033 Cincinnati, Ohio 45221-0033

Phone: 513-556-1424

Contact Us | Staff Directory

University of Cincinnati

Alerts | Clery and HEOA Notice | Notice of Non-Discrimination | eAccessibility Concern | Privacy Statement | Copyright Information

© 2019 University of Cincinnati