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Advanced Legal Research: Researching Secondary Sources & Practice Tools

This guide will help you research in secondary sources and practice tools.

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Overview

Legal materials can fall into two different categories:  (1) Primary and (2) Secondary.  Secondary sources are about the law.  They explain, analyze, interpret, discuss, and cite to primary sources.  Examples of secondary sources include:

  • Legal Dictionaries
  • Legal Encyclopedias
  • American Law Reports
  • Restatements
  • Legal periodicals
  • Treatises

Secondary sources can only be persuasive, they can never be mandatory or binding on a court of law.  The persuasive value of a secondary source depends on its author. Using secondary sources can save legal researchers time and money.

Practice Tools are a subset of secondary sources.  Examples of practice tools are:

  • Form books
  • Desk books
  • Jury verdict and settlement reporters

Research Process Flowchart

Where do secondary sources fall in the research process? Well, if you’re following a basic research strategy, after you analyze your facts, you'll want to consult secondary sources to learn more about your issues and to get references to primary sources.

Research Process Flowchart

CALI Lesson on Secondary Sources

CALI LogoAvailable to Law Students only (see a reference librarian if you do not have a CALI activation code).

Legal Dictionaries

Overview

Legal dictionaries provide short definitions or explanations of terms and phrases. The sources for the definitions will vary by dictionary.  Legal dictionaries are great places to get an understanding of legal terminology but they are not particularly authoritative sources. 

Search the UC Library Catalog

Search UCLID for additional legal dictionaries by clicking the link below:

Law -- United States -- Dictionaries

Selected Legal Dictionaries

Citation Format for Dictionaries

Bluebook

Rule 15.8 and B15.1 of the Bluebook (20th ed. 2015) governs the citation of dictionaries.

Elements

The citation should include the following:

  • Word (italicized)
  • Dictionary (underlined)
  • Edition
  • Year

Example

Replevin, Black's Law Dictionary (10th ed. 2014).

ALWD

Rule 22.1(a) of the ALWD Citation Manual (5th ed. 2014) covers the citation of dictionaries.

Elements

The citation should include the following:

  • Title of the Dictionary (italicized of underlined)
  • Page number
  • Editor
  • Edition
  • Year

Example

Black's Law Dictionary 14291 (Bryan A. Garner ed., 10th ed. 2014).

 

Encyclopedias

Overview

Use a legal encyclopedia for background and to help you get a sense of the vocabulary for your issue.  These are an excellent place to start if you do not know much about a topic.  Although great for background material, avoid citing to an encyclopedia as your source of authority for an argument.  Why aren’t they considered very authoritative?  They  don’t supply deep analysis, they are not written by acknowledged experts in the field, and their citations to primary sources are limited.

General Legal Encyclopedias

There are two general legal encyclopedias: American Jurisprudence 2d (Am. Jur.) and Corpus Juris Secundum (C.J.S.).

State Legal Encyclopedias

Many states have legal encyclopedias that focus on state law. Ohio, for example, has Ohio Jurisprudence 3d.

Finding Tools within Encyclopedias

Index

Table of Contents

Table of Cases

Table of Laws & Rules

Desk Book

New Topic Service

Words & Phrases

Updating

Print copies of encyclopedias are updated by pocket parts or supplements.

CALI Lesson on Legal Encyclopedias

CALI LogoAvailable to Law Students only (see a reference librarian if you do not have a CALI activation code).

Citation Format for Encyclopedias

Bluebook

Rule 15.8 and BT.1 of the Bluebook (20th ed.) covers the citation of encyclopedias. 

Elements

The citation should include the following:

  • Volume
  • Encyclopedia abbeviation
  • Article title (underlined or italicized)
  • Section
  • Copyright date of the volume (in the parenthetical)

Examples

88 C.J.S. Trial § 192 (1955).

17 Am. Jur. 2d Contracts § 74 (1964).

14 Ohio Jur. 3d Civil Rights § 82 (2006).

ALWD

Rule 22.3 of the ALWD Citation Manual (5th ed.) covers the citation of legal encyclopedias.

Elements

The citation should include the following:

  • Volume
  • Encyclopedia Abbreviation (see Chart 22.1)
  • Title or Topic (italicize or underline)
  • Section
  • Year (in the parenthetical)
    • When citing an encyclopedic entry in a commercial database, rather than the year in the parenthetical, add the name of the database provider and provide the date through which the database is current.

Examples

88 C.J.S. Trial § 192 (1955).

17 Am. Jur. 2d Contracts § 74 (1964).

14 Ohio Jur. 3d Civil Rights § 82 (2006).

American Law Reports

Overview

American Law Reports contain two kinds of material: articles and cases. Articles cover a topic through cases that focus on a particular point of law.  These articles collect the cases from a variety of state and federal courts or jurisdictions and arrange them according to how the courts have ruled.

American Law Reports are great to use for researching narrow topics, doing a survey of existing law, identifying trends in the law, and finding persuasive case law.

The ALR consists of nine series.

  • Six adress primarily state topics (A.L.R., A.L.R. 2d, A.L.R. 3d, A.L.R.4th, A.L.R. 5th, A.L.R. 6th, and  A.L.R. 7th 
  • Two are specific to federal issues (A.L.R. Fed., A.L.R. Fed. 2d, and A.L.R. Fed. 3d
  • One is for subjects pertaining to international law (A.L.R. Int'l)

American Law Reports

Finding Tools Within ALRs

ALR Complete Series Index

ALR Quick Index

ALR Digest

ALR Table of Laws, Rules and Regulations

ALR Table of Cases

ALR Article Index

ALR Article Outline

Table of Jurisdictions

Updating

All ALR series continue to be updated, though not on a regular schedule.

ALR - Search each volume of the ALR Blue Book of Supplemental Decisions (see below)
ALR 2d - Search in the appropriate volume and pocket part of the ALR2d Later Case Service (see below)
ALR 3rd - 7th, ALR Fed series - Search the pocket part of the same volume

Video Tutorials on American Law Reports

CALI Lesson on American Law Reports

CALI LogoAvailable to Law Students only (see a reference librarian if you do not have a CALI activation code).

Citation Format for American Law Reports

Bluebook

Rule 16.7.6 of the Bluebook (20th ed) covers how to cite ALRs. 

Elements

The citation should contain:

  • Author
  • the word "Annotation"
  • Title (italicized or underlined)
  • ALR volume
  • ALR series
  • Page number
  • Copyright date of volume

Example

William B. Johnson, Annotation, Use of Plea Bargain or Grant of Immunity as Improper Vouching for Credibility of Witness in Federal Cases, 76 A.L.R. Fed. 409 (1986 & Supp. 2015).

ALWD

Rule 22.6 of the ALWD Citation Manual (5th ed.) covers the citation of ALRs.

Elements

The citation should contain:

  • Author
  • the word "Annotation"
  • Title (italicized or underlined)
  • ALR Volume
  • ALR Series (see chart 24.1 for abbreviations)
  • Page (if pinpoint citing, both the initial page and the pinpoint reference)
  • Copyright date of volume

Example

William B. Johnson, Annotation, Use of Plea Bargain or Grant of Immunity as Improper Vouching for Credibility of Witness in Federal Cases, 76 A.L.R. Fed. 409 (1986 & Supp. 2015).

 

Restatements

Overview

Restatements of the Law are highly regarded uniform statements of the common law produced by the American Law Institute (ALI), an organization comprised of prominent American judges, lawyers, and law professors.

Each restatement is arranged first by chapter, then by topic and title, and then by section. Restatement sections generally begin with a "black letter" statement of the law followed by comments, illustrations, and reporter notes.

The appendix volumes of each set contain annotated citations of cases that cite that particular restatement.

Restatements of the Law

Print

Restatements can be found most easily in the Reference 2 collection.

Online

Finding Tools Within Restatements

Index -- Note that there is no comprehensive index for the restatements

  • Restatement, First Series contains a one-volume index for all restatements in the first series
  • Each Restatement within the first series also has its own index
  • Restatements, Second and Third Series have indexes either for each volume, in the last volume, or in a separate volume

Table of Contents

Appendix Volumes

Updating

Update the print volumes through pocket parts.

Video Tutorial on Restatements of the Law

CALI Lesson on American Law Reports

CALI LogoAvailable to Law Students only (see a reference librarian if you do not have a CALI activation code).

Citation

Bluebook

Rule 12.9 of the Bluebook (20th ed.) covers the citation of restatements.

Elements

The citation should include the following:

  • Restatement series (italicized or underlined)
  • Section
  • Copyright date of the volume

Example

Restatement (Third) of Torts § 46 (2012).

ALWD

Rule 23 of the ALWD Citation Manual (5th ed.) covers the citation of restatements.

Elements

The citation should include the following:

  • Restatement series (italicized or underlined)
  • Section
  • Copyright date

Example

Restatement (Third) of Torts § 46 (2012).

Treatises

Overview

A legal treatise is a book or set of books on a legal topic that are written by experts. Sometimes students get confused between "treatise" and "treaty."   A treatise is a scholarly book or set of books about a legal topic. It is a secondary source. A treaty is a primary source legal agreement between countries. A good treatise is thorough, explaining and even critiquing, the law. A treatise can be an extremely useful secondary source for research because it gathers such detailed information on a particular legal topic or issue into one publication. 

If you practice in a certain area of law, you will become familiar with the well-known and highly respected treatises in that area. If you are unfamiliar with an area of law, consult a research guide on that area of law written by a law librarian.

Finding Tools Within Treatises

Indexes

Table of Contents

Updating

Many treatises are updated by pocket parts or supplements.  Some treatises, known as "loose-leafs" are updated by new pages being inserted into a binder.

Books available through Lexis, Westlaw & Bloomberg BNA

There are many treatises available through Lexis, Westlaw, and Bloomberg Law.

Search the UC Library Catalog

Always check UCLID first to see if a book is available in our library or another UC library. Note that even if checking out a book for a UC journal, YOU and not the journal are responsible for that book.  Be sure and renew and return your books as needed.

When you find a title through UCLID, the online catalog, that is owned by another library:

  • Click on the Request button. 
  • Enter your username and password
  • Select Law Library as your pick-up library
  • Click on the Submit button.

The book will be delivered to the Law Library and you will receive an email in your UC email account when it comes. Be aware that it may take 3 or more days to arrive. Note that if your pick-up location and request location are the same, the request is not processed. In other words, if a book is available in the law library, do not request it. Instead retrieve the book yourself and check it out.

OhioLINK Catalog Search

 If a book you want is not available at UC, you may be able to find and borrow it through the OhioLINK.  Be sure and check UCLID first.  OhioLINK is also accessible through UCLID (click the search OhioLINK button)

 

by

for:

Note that even if checking out a book for a UC journal, YOU and not the journal are responsible for that book.  Be sure and renew and return your books as needed.  Renew books or check due dates.

The book will be delivered to the Law Library and you will be notified when it comes.  Please remember that all library communications are sent to your UC email account so be sure and check it regularly or forward it to an email account that you do check regularly.  Be aware that it may take 5 or more days to arrive.

WorldCat Catalog

If a book you want is not available in UCLID or OhioLINK, you will need to submit an Interlibrary Loan Request.

  • Find the book in WorldCat (use the box below for a simple search, use the WorldCat Advanced Search for more search options).
  • Fill out an ILL form with the information you found in WorldCat.
Search for an item in libraries near you:

WorldCat.org >>

Note that the Law Library does not use ILLiad at this time.

The book will be delivered to the Law Library and you will be notified when it comes.  Please remember that all library communications are sent to your UC email account so be sure and check it regularly or forward it to an email account that you do check regularly.  Be aware that it may take 10 or more days to arrive.  Circulation loan periods will vary.  Renewal options will also vary.  Generally, ILL material can only be used in the Law Library.

 

Google Books

Some books may be available via Google Books.  Primarily, these are books within the public domain.  Limited previews may be offered for other books.  If you need a copy of a book found through Google Books, please check WorldCat and fill out an Interlibrary Loan Request.

Video Tutorials on Treatises

CALI Lesson on Subject Specific Treatises

CALI LogoAvailable to Law Students only (see a reference librarian if you do not have a CALI activation code).

Citation Format for Treatises

Bluebook

Rule 15 of the Bluebook (20th ed.) covers citing treatises. There are many variables in citing a treatise so definitely consult the rule for its many permutations. 

Elements

Generally, a citation to a treatise should contain the following elements:

  • Volume (if applicable)
  • Author (see R. 15(b) for more than 2 authors and R. 15(c) for institutional authors)
  • Title (italicized or underlined)
  • Section and/or Page
  • Editor, translators (if applicable)
  • Edition
  • Copyright Date

Example

2 Joseph M. Perillo & Helen Hadjiyannakis Bender, Corbin on Contracts § 1.1 (1993).

ALWD

Rule 20.3 of the ALWD Citation Manual (5th ed.) covers the citation of books.

Elements
  • Volume number (if applicable)
  • Author (see R. 20.1(b)(2) for multiple authors and R. 20.1(b)(3) for institutional authors
  • Title (italicized or underlined)
  • Section and/or Page
  • Editor, translators (if applicable)
  • Edition
  • Date

Example

2 Joseph M. Perillo & Helen Hadjiyannakis Bender, Corbin on Contracts § 1.1 (1993).

Legal Periodicals

Overview

Law Reviews are scholarly legal publications published by law schools or other organizations.  Examples here at UC are the University of Cincinnati Law Review, Immigration and Naturalization Law Review, Freedom Center Journal, and Human Rights Quarterly. 

Law reviews can be great sources of information because they can give good policy arguments, broad background information, focus in on narrow topics, as well as cover very cutting edge and controversial topics.

Other types of periodicals that you will come across include legal magazines, newspapers, and newsletters. These are usually more practitioner oriented.  They give practical information on the practice of law and serve as current awareness functions. 

Legal Periodical Indexes

Note that these are indexes, not full-text sources. The index will give you the citation to an article which you would then need to retrieve if you wanted to review the full-text. There may be some overlap in coverage by the indexes but each covers some periodicals that the others do not.

Full-Text Legal Periodical Sources

Due to subscription and licensing agreements, certain library resources are restricted to UC faculty, staff, and currently enrolled students. Some of these databases are available to the entire University of Cincinnati community. Others are restricted to the College of Law.

CALI Lesson on Periodicals Indexes and Library Catalogs

CALI LogoAvailable to Law Students only (see a reference librarian if you do not have a CALI activation code).

Video Tutorials on Legal Periodicals

Citation Format for Legal Periodicals

Bluebook

Rule 16 of the Bluebook (20th ed.) covers the citation of law reviews.

Consecutively paginated law reviews and journals (R. 16.4)

Elements

The citation should include the following:

  • Author's name
  • If the article is written by a student author, the designation of the piece (see R. 16.7.1)
  • Title of the article (in italics or underlined)
  • Volume number (if no volume, use the year as the volume and don't put the year at the end)
  • Abbreviation of journal name (Tables 10,13, and 13.2 in the Bluebook)
  • The beginning page number (if pinpoint citing, include the beginning page number and the pinpoint cite)
  • Year (in parenthesis)
Example:

Charles A. Reich, The New Property, 73 Yale L.J. 733, 737-38 (1964).

Nonconsecutively paginated periodicals (R. 16.5)

Elements

The citation should include the following:

  • Author
  • Title of the article (in italics or underlined)
  • Abbreviation of journal name (see Tables 10 and 13 in the Bluebook)
  • Date as it appears on the cover (if no date of issue is available, provide the issue number and indicate the volume number before the title)
  • the word "at"
  • The beginning page number (if pinpoint citing, include the beginning page number and the pinpoint cite)
Example:

Susan A. Berson, Starting Up: If You're Hanging a Shingle in 2011, A.B.A. J., Jan. 2011, at 40.

Newspapers (R. 16.6)

 The citation format for newspapers and newsletters is largely the same as for nonconsecutively paginated periodicals. See your Bluebook for specific exceptions involving special designations, place of publication etc.

ALWD

Rule 21 of the ALWD Citation Manual (5th ed.) covers the citation of periodicals.

Consecutively paginated law reviews and journals

Elements

The citation should include the following:

  • Author
    • If the author is a student, insert "student author" after the name.
  • Title (italicized or underlined)
  • Volume (if no volume put the year and don't repeat the year at the end)
  • Periodical Abbreviation (see Appendix 5)
  • Page (if pinpoint citing, include the beginning page number and the pinpoint cite)
  • Date
Example

Charles A. Reich, The New Property, 73 Yale L.J. 733, 737-38 (1964).

Nonconsecutively paginated periodicals

Elements

The citation should include the following:

  • Author
    • If the author is a student, insert "student author" after the name.
  • Title (italicized or underlined)
  • Volume number (if exists)
  • Periodical Abbreviation (see Appendix 5)
  • Publication Date
  • the word "at"
  • Page (if pinpoint citing, include the beginning page number and the pinpoint cite)
  • Date (use exact date and if there is no specific date, include the abbreviation "no." and the issue number followed by the year)

Susan A. Berson, Starting Up: If You're Hanging a Shingle in 2011, 97 A.B.A. J., Jan. 2011, at 40.

Transactional Form Books & Checklists

Overview

Let’s talk about things that are not treatises, specifically form books and practice guides. There are two types of legal practice:

  1) Transactional practice or out of court practice; and

  2) Trial Practice

Transactional practice involves the drafting of contracts, wills, and other documents and advising clients of compliance with the law; and on deal making, etc. There are all types of transactional practice material out there.  There’s no point in you re-inventing the wheel if you don’t have to. Transactional practice material provide collections of sample legal forms that use boiler-plate language.  Often you can get multiple types of a form.  For example, a longer, detailed form or a shorter form. Forms can operate as a checklist to ensure that you do not forget to include something or show you how something is formatted.  Particularly useful are the annotated form sets which will tell you why certain clauses are necessary and let you know whether it is pro-purchaser or pro-seller, etc.

One thing to keep in mind any time you are looking to use a form is that you don’t want to just take a form off the shelf and use it.  You’re going to need to change and adapt it to your jurisdiction and circumstances. 

Bloomberg Law Transactional Forms

Bloomberg Law Icon  NOTE: These resources are only available to UC Law students and faculty.

Bloomberg Law is a great resource for transactional forms.  Search for forms across content, or check out some specific collections, like ALI-ABA or PLI forms, both linked from thetransactional research resources or the DealMaker Documents and DealMaker Clauses.

Gale Legal Forms

Gale Legal Forms (available from The Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County -- Must be a library card holder to access).

General legal forms available include real estate contracts, wills, premarital agreements, landlord tenant forms, business, corporation, and many others.
Gale Legal Forms Help Guide

Lexis Practice Advisor

NOTE: These resources are only available to UC Law students and faculty.

Lexis Practice Advisor is a Lexis product that provides a comprehensive portal for specific transactional practice areas.  It provides model forms and agreements with annotations (these forms can be downloaded into Microsoft Word); relevant secondary source materials; practice tips and checklists; emerging issues information; and selected cases and codes. From the Lexis Advance search screen, select “Lexis Practice Advisor” from the red "Research" drop-down menu in the upper left corner.

Lexis Practice Advisor User Guide

Selected Transactional Form Books in Print

Form books can be found in UCLID by title or keyword searches or by doing a subject search. There are many subject specific form books.

Clicking on a link below will do a subject search on UCLID with that subject heading.

Lexis Advance Transactional Forms

Lexis Advance Icon   NOTE: These resources are only available to UC Law students and faculty.

Search across content type for forms. You can also set a pre-search filter to specify forms under the content types drop-down. You can also go to Browse Sources > Search Sources > and search "forms" in the box to see what form databases are available.

There are numerous subject specific form databases.

Practice Form Books & Checklists

Overview

Let’s talk about things that are not treatises, specifically form books and practice guides. There are two types of legal practice:

  1) Transactional practice or out of court practice; and

  2) Trial Practice

Trial Practice materials involve things used in the actual litigation.  Examples of these would be complaints, answers, motions, etc.

One thing to keep in mind any time you are looking to use a form is that you don’t want to just take a form off the shelf and use it.  You’re going to need to change and adapt it to your jurisdiction and circumstances.

Selected Practice Form Books

Form books can be found in UCLID by title or keyword searches or by doing a subject search..

Clicking on a link below will do a subject search on UCLID with that subject heading.

Selected Practice Sets on Rules

Lexis Litigation Profile Suite

NOTE: These resources are only available to UC Law students and faculty.

Lexis Litigation Profile Suite Demo (YouTube)

Lexis Litigation Profile Suite Brochure and User Tips (PDF)

Expert Witness Searching on Lexis Advance (PDF)

From the Lexis Advance search screen, select “Litigation Profile Suite” from the red "Research" drop-down menu in the upper left corner. The Expert Witness profiles provide information about an expert witness’s current contact information, current position, education, past case involvement, and more. Attorney profiles provide information on an attorney’s prior experience with similar lawsuits, areas of expertise, past verdicts and more. The Judge Profile draws upon courtroom records, news, and other resources to give you an understanding of their past ruling tendencies and experience in a particular area of law.

Lexis Advance Practice Sets & Forms

  NOTE: These resources are only available to UC Law students and faculty.

Be sure and also look by subject.

Court Rules

Overview

Court rules provide the parties with information and instructions on matters pertaining to judicial proceedings.  They establish uniform procedures such as filing deadlines, proper formatting, delivery method, timing, etc. and they aid the court in performing its business.

You can find some court rules in your annotated code.  This is very useful because it allows you to pick up journals and cases discussing those rules.  Some treatises reprint court rules as well as provide analysis and explanation of them. Most court websites also provide their court rules.

A useful tip is to look at the structure of litigation.  The rules are generally listed in the order that litigation occurs.  You can safely divide rules up into pre-trial, trial, post-trial, and appellate.  You’ll have rules of civil procedure, rules of criminal procedure, rules of evidence, and appellate rules.

To view practice sets on court rules, see the Practice Forms & Checklists page.

Ohio Court Rules Books

Both Page's Ohio Revised Code Annotated and Baldwin's Ohio Revised Code Annotated have annotated versions of the Ohio rules.

Ohio Court Rules Online

Selected Practice Sets on Rules

Federal Court Rules Books

Both the USCA and the USCS have annotated versions of the federal rules, which include Advisory Committee notes.

Federal Court Rules Online

Jury Instructions, Verdicts & Settlements

Overview

Before juries begin their deliberations the judge instructs them on the applicable law.  Often attorneys have the opportunity to submit proposed instructions to the judge in advance, tailoring these instructions to the pleadings and evidence in the particular case.  It is at the judge's discretion whether to use, adapt, or dismiss these instructions.  They are often very important to the outcome of the jury’s deliberations.  You will often find jury instructions referred to as pattern or non-pattern jury instructions.  Sometimes jury instructions are specifically endorsed by the courts.

Jury verdicts are mostly aimed at tort & personal injury lawsuits.  They provide detailed profiles of litigants, accidents, injuries.  They are used for guidance in requesting damages.  They are usually expensive and none are comprehensive.  Generally, there is not a lot of overlap in the various services.

Lexis Advance Verdict & Settlement Analyzer

NOTE: These resources are only available to UC Law students and faculty.

From the Lexis Advance search screen, select “Verdict & Settlement Analyzer” from the red "Research" drop-down menu in the upper left corner.

Verdict & Settlement Analyzer examines the outcomes of cases similar to yours and summarizes the results in a series of graphs and charts, which can then be examined more closely for specific verdict information, such as the case topic, specific results, and key players.

Lexis Advance Tutorial on Using the Jury Verdict & Settlement Analyzer (Video)

Lexis Verict & Settlement Analyzer (PDF)

Federal Jury Instructions

Books with jury instructions can be found in UCLID by title or keyword searches or by doing a subject search..

Clicking on a link below will do a subject search on UCLID with that subject heading.

Jury Instructions -- United States

Bloomberg Law:  Federal Jury Instructions


Jury Verdicts & Settlements

When looking for jury verdicts online, look either by jurisdiction or topic.  Remember to use segments and fields. 

NOTE: These resources are only available to UC Law students and faculty.

Westlaw:

Lexis Advance:

  • Browse Sources > Content Type > Select Jury Verdicts and Settlements

Ohio Jury Instructions

Ohio Jury Instructions are published in conjunction with the Ohio Jury Instructions Committee of the Ohio Judicial Conference.

Books with jury instructions can be found in UCLID by title or keyword searches or by doing a subject search..

Clicking on a link below will do a subject search on UCLID with that subject heading.

Jury Instructions -- Ohio

Note: The following resources are only available to UC Law students, faculty, and staff

Off Campus Access to Databases

Off Campus Access to Databases

VPN Login Button

When to Use: Ideal method for longer research sessions lasting up to 4 hours. You can login to the VPN, or install a client on your device. Preferred login for UC. Login using your 6+2 and Central Login password.

VPN Software Installation for Access
Setup instructions for downloading and installing the VPN software
(we've had reports that the manual installation instructions are more reliable, especially for Macs.):

Once installed, you start the SSL VPN client from your computer/device and then launch your browser and begin your research.

Proxy Login Button

When to Use: Ideal for research sessions that require quick and easy access. 

How to Connect: Click on the Library Off Campus Access (Proxy) Button to login with your UC ID username and password (6+2). Once you login, you'll be returned to the main UC Library homepage and can begin your research.


Questions?
Troubleshooting Tips
Call UCIT's Help Desk: 556-4357

Law Library Useful Links

Get Help & About the Author

About the Author

Susan BolandSusan M. Boland
Associate Director of Public & Research Services
Robert S. Marx Law Library
Office 315
susan.boland@uc.edu
v: (513) 556-4407
f: (513) 556-6265

Susan Boland is the Associate Director of Public & Research Services for the University of Cincinnati Robert. S. Marx Law Library. She teaches legal research and offers reference and research support services to all law library users. Prior to joining the law library faculty, she was the Head of Information Services for the Ruth Lilly Law Library at the Robert H. McKinney School of Law and the Research & Instructional Services librarian at Northern Illinois University College of Law. She has also held positions at a public library and community college library and served as a judicial clerk for the Iowa District Court for the Fifth Judicial District.  She is a member of various professional associations both regionally and nationally, and was Chair of the Computing Services Special Interest Section of the American Association of Law Libraries. She has presented at regional and national conferences, as well as at continuing legal education programs. Her publications include annotated bibliographies on the death penalty and election law, as well as articles on legal research, technology, and teaching.

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